D1: Learning Process

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Domain 1. LEARNING PROCESS
Rationale:
Effective teachers recognize that successful students are actively engaged in the learning process. The primary task of schools is to produce work that engages students. Work should be so compelling it secures the interest of students when they experience difficulties, so challenging that students have a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction—indeed, of delight—when they successfully accomplish the tasks assigned.
Below are the foundational components identified as Alamo Heights ISD best practices for ensuring active, successful student participation in the learning process.



1a. Engaged in Learning

Things to consider
Students are focused on the learning objective during the academic learning time.
There is evidence of alignment of activities with the learning objective.

Quantity
  • Focus on the number of students actively engaged in the learning of regular intervals.
Quality
  • Engagement in the learning produces student success. Look for the level of engagement as determined by the strength, impact, variety and alignment of the activities with the learning objective.
Quality Indicators
  • Students are consistently engaged and successful in learning that has great depth and complexity.
  • Student engagement is consistently self-directed/intrinsically motivated.
  • Students consistently take reasonable risks in responding, extending, questioning, and/or producing products.
  • Students are consistently engaged in connecting/applying learning to their disciplines, their own lives, and/or issues in the world beyond the classroom.
  • Multiple instructional strategies aligned with the learning objectives are used to engage learning.
  • Students check understanding of assignment or expectations.
  • Student work actively on assigned task, follow directions as given.
  • Students perform manipulation of appropriate materials consistent with the assignment form text/teacher; demonstrate basic level of understanding.
  • Student collectively share ideas evidenced when the teacher asks questions prompting an interchange between students.
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Learner Engagement (Schlechty, 2002)
Engagement (formerly "Authentic") - The task or activity assigned to the student has clear meaning and immediate value to the student. There are direct, meaningful, relevant connections to the students. If given the choice, the student would want to be doing this.

Strategic Compliance (formerly "Ritual") - The task or activity assigned to the student has extrinsic results that are of value. The students are doing this because of the grade or some other type of reward.

Ritual Compliance (formerly "Passive Compliance") - The task or activity assigned is being completed to avoid negative consequences. The students are doing this to avoid penalties/consequences.

Retreatism– The students are disengaged from the task and expend little or no energy to comply with teacher requests, but do not disrupt others.

Rebellion - The students refuse to do the task and are disruptive.


1b. Successful in Learning

Things to Consider
Students demonstrate success with the stated, implied or written learning objectives.
Assessment is aligned with the stated, implied or written learning objectives.

Quantity
  • Focus on the number of students that are assessed. Focus on the number of students that are successful in learning.
Quality
  • Assessment criteria and standards are clear and have been communicated to the student.Look at the level of success of students through strength, impact, variety and alignment of the assessment with the content and instruction.
Quality Indicators
  • Students are consistently successful in learning. Learning objectives have great depth and complexity.
  • Student engagement and success are consistently self-directed and intrinsically motivated.
  • Students consistently take reasonable risks in responding, extending, questioning, and/or producing products.
  • Students are consistently successful in connecting/applying learning to their disciplines, their own lives, and/or issues in the world beyond the classroom.
  • Students are consistently assessed on learning that is aligned with the learning objectives.
  • Students are comfortable with explaining their ideas and communicating solutions both verbally and in writing.
  • Students develop multiple solutions and justify their responses.
  • Discussion, feedback, and student language is aligned with the learning objective and teacher expectations.
  • Students are interacting and helping each other learn
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Suggested resources for continued professional development:
  • Full Text Articles


Books

Understanding by Desgin, Expanded 2nd Edition Grant Wiggins, Jay McTighe

10192011_100509_0.jpg Checking for Understanding: Formative Assessment Techniques for Your Classroom DOUGLAS FISHER, NANCY FREY
image Six Pathways to Healthy Child Development and Academic Success, Dr. James Comer
10192011_100509_2.jpg The Differentiated Classroom.
10192011_100509_3.png Teach Like a Champion


1c. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Things to Consider
Students are involved in learning activities at the application level or higher on Bloom’s Taxonomy.
Learning activities produce a logical and innovative approach, or a solution to a problem or concern.

Quantity
  • Focus on the number of students involved in learning activities at the application level or higher on Bloom’s Taxonomy, when appropriate to the learning objective.
Quality
  • Look at the level of thinking to determine the strength, impact, variety and alignment of the learning activity. Learning activities are at the application level or higher on Bloom’s Taxonomy when appropriate to the learning objective. Students are challenged by the instruction.
Quality Indicators
  • Students are consistently successful in critical thinking and problem solving activities (i.e., application level or higher on Bloom’s Taxonomy).
  • Students are consistently engaged successfully in unique, creative, and/or innovative critical thinking/problem solving activities.
  • Students’ critical thinking/problem solving consistently leads to connections between new learning and prior/future learning, other disciplines, the world of the student, and/or issues in the world beyond the classroom.
  • Students consistently initiate and/or devise their own strategies for critical thinking/problem solving and/or devise their own activities.
  • Students consistently construct their own knowledge through inquiry and experience.
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY

10192011_101144_8.png
10192011_101057_6.jpg
New Version
Old Version
Remembering: can the student recall or remember the information?
define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce state
Understanding: can the student explain ideas or concepts?
classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphrase
Applying: can the student use the information in a new way?
choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write.
Analyzing: can the student distinguish between the different parts?
appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test.
Evaluating: can the student justify a stand or decision?
appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate
Creating: can the student create new product or point of view?
assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write.



ahisd logo
Suggested resources for continued professional development:


Excellent sheet for planning lessons
Use this matrix in your Reading Program.
~investigate a book the blooming-smart way.doc
Thinking Framework

This poster is intended for the classroom wall and will complement the teacher’s use of the innovative teachers’ companions.


Poster for Bloom's
It lists a number of tasks for students to complete in terms of their current reading book. They are generic activities organized across all smarts and catering for all level of Bloom's Taxonomy that students can select from. An excellent resource developed by Kelsie Torrisi.



bloom pyramid.jpg


Bloomin' Google.jpg







1d. Self-Directed

Things to Consider
Students create or extend a skills, knowledge or concept connected to the learning objective.
Students initiate or adapt activities and projects to enhance understanding.
Students demonstrate task commitment.

Quantity
  • Focus on the number of students that are appropriately self-directed/self-initiated.
Quality
  • Focus on appropriateness of content for self-directed/self initiated opportunities.
Quality Indicators
  • Students are consistently successful in extending the learning, appropriately questioning the teacher and/or peers, and/or producing products using appropriate self-directed/self-initiated activities.
  • Students are consistently successful in finding their own strategies for connecting/applying learning to other disciplines, their own lives, and/or issues in the world beyond the classroom.
  • The teachers uses a variety of motivational and instructional strategies to promote student responsibility/investment in appropriate self-directed/self-initiated activities.
  • Students design and create complex, multi-faceted projects.
  • Students collectively share ideas evidenced when the teacher asks a question prompting an nterchange between students.
  • Students seek their own process of thinking aligned with learning objectives and tasks.

ahisd logo
Suggested resources for continued professional development:

102111_75919_0.pngThe Self-Directed Learning Handbook By Maurice Gibbons



assessment strategies for self directed learning.jpgAssessment Strategies for Self-Directed Learning By Arthur L. Costa & Bena Kallick

Consider talking with elementary teaches about Daily 5 and Daily Cafe-for building student independence.







1e. Connecting Learning

Things to Consider
Students demonstrate a connection to the learning to work and life applications.
Students demonstrate a connection of the learning to prior/future learning within the discipline.
Students demonstrate a connection of the learning with other disciplines.
Students connect and apply learning to predictable and unpredictable real-life situations.

Quantity
  • Focus on the number of students that can demonstrate a connection of the learning to work and life applications, both within the discipline and with other disciplines.
Quality
  • Look for strength, impact, variety, and alignment of the connection with the learning objective.
Quality Indicators
  • Depth and complexity of learning are consistently characterized by successful student connection of the learning with prior/future learning within the discipline, with other disciplines, with studentsí interests/experiences, and/or with issues beyond the classroom.
  • Student responsibility/investment in complex learning is consistent.
  • Student consistently take responsibility/investment in complex learning is consistent.
  • Students consistently take reasonable risks in responding, extending, questioning, and/or producing products.
  • Students are consistently engaged in producing or evaluating high quality products, which connect learning with real-world predictable and unpredictable situations.
  • Students are engaged in learning experiences which are high in rigor and relevance.

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Suggested resources for continued professional development in the areas of:


 

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